Minor Triads

red triangle
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Minor triads are much like major triads, but played out of context they can sound a little ‘sadder’. Their construction is almost the same, however instead of 1, 3, and 5, we take 1, b3, and 5.

To use the example of C Minor, we need to first start with the scale of C Major:

C     D     E     F     G     A      B     C

   1, 3, and 5        =        C, E, and G

But we need to Flatten the E so it becomes an Eb

The C minor triad therefore consists of  C, Eb, and G.

—–

D Minor would be (again starting with the scale of D Major):

D     E     F#     G     A     B     C#    D

   1, 3, and 5        =        D, F#, and A

But we need to Flatten the F# so it becomes a F

The D minor triad therefore consists of  D, F, and A.

—–

A Minor, (again starting with the scale of A Major):

A     B     C#     D      E      F#      G#     A

   1, 3, and 5        =        A, C#, and E

But we need to Flatten the C# so it becomes a C

The A minor triad therefore consists of  C, Eb, and G.


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