Robert Johnson

Born in Mississippi in 1911, Johnson knew little commercial or critical success during his lifetime, and yet is now considered a master of his art, his art being the Delta blues. His style is raw and gritty as he imitates a whole group playing at once, famously inducing Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards to remark “Who’s … More Robert Johnson

Joe Pass

Born in the year of the beginning of the great depression, 1929, Joe Pass’ sound is an exquisite mix of Bebop and Blues. He notably played for many years with Oscar Peterson and they created a wonderful trio album together with the double bass player NHOP, aptly called ‘The Trio‘. Pass’ genius really comes into its own … More Joe Pass

Wes Montgomery

No conversation about the history of jazz guitar would be complete without hearing the name ‘Wes Montgomery‘. Born in Indianapolis in 1923, he developed and advanced the earlier ‘swing to bop’ style of Charlie Christian and learnt many of his solos note for note. His distinctive sound came from his unusual technique of playing with … More Wes Montgomery

Jimmy Page

Born in Greater London, England, in 1944, and primarily known for being the guitarist of Led Zeppelin, Jimmy Page has influenced a generation of Rock guitarists with his powerful pentatonic riff based hard rock sound. Formed in 1968 Led Zeppelin are considered alongside Black Sabbeth to be one of the main precursors to heavy metal. … More Jimmy Page

Jimi Hendrix

Jimi Hendrix is largely considered to be one of the greatest and most influential guitarists of the 20th century. Born in Seattle in 1942, his style is derived from blues musicians of older generations; BB King, Muddy Waters, Robert Johnson etc, and rock ‘n’ roll musicians such as Elvis and Little Richard. His fusion created … More Jimi Hendrix

Bar Chords

Bar chords are notoriously difficult when learning the guitar, so don’t be discouraged if you can’t play them perfectly right away. They are however extremely useful as once you can play the G / Sol (shown in the photo below), you can play all the other major chords too, by simply sliding up and down … More Bar Chords